Duluth Contact Us

Dee Ann Witte
Program Administrator
deeann.witte@essentiahealth.org
218-529-9102

University of Minnesota Duluth Family Medicine Residency
Duluth Family Medicine Clinic
330 N Eighth Ave E
Duluth, MN 55805


Frequently asked questions

How many deliveries do you do during residency?

How many deliveries do you do during residency?

Obstetrics is one of our core rotations here in Duluth along with Family Medicine Service, Adult Medicine, and Pediatrics.

Upon graduation our residents can expect to have delivered between 100 and 150 babies; the program also provides a significant amount of high risk obstetrics and the opportunity to collaborate with NICU admissions while on OB and pediatrics.

The clinical portion of the OB/GYN rotation has also been enhanced with more outpatient procedural experience including colposcopy, IUD insertion, and exposure to treatment modalities for precancerous/cancerous cervical lesions.

Lastly, our OB/GYN rotation is service based. This means our resident team covers all patients on the floor. As a result, this improves continuity of care and augments our perinatal management skills greatly. We follow all patients from the minute they are on the floor until they walk out the door. This contributes to a more robust experience because we are doing more than delivering babies—we are managing complex patients with preeclampsia and postpartum complications from door to door

We believe this holistic approach better prepares our residents for any practice setting they may choose to enter.

Can I get c-section training in your program?

Can I get c-section training in your program?

Residents can expect to perform 50 to 75 primary cesarean sections during their third year. There are also numerous opportunities to be the first assist during the first two years of residency.

What kind of critical care experience do you get?

What kind of critical care experience do you get?

Our critical care experience is both focused and longitudinal.

We admit patients to the ICU throughout our four months of internal medicine, family medicine service, and chief resident rotations. Additionally, all second-year residents complete a one block critical care rotation where they work directly with the critical care physicians admitting and following patients in the ICU on a daily basis. It is rich in both didactic and procedural experience.

Residents regularly perform procedures including intubations, chest tubes, and central lines. Ultrasound-guided procedures are commonly performed as well. Residents gain experience caring for critically ill patients as well as exposure to toxicology, ventilator management, acid/base disorders, and treatment of sepsis.

Will I spend time in rural practices?

Will I spend time in rural practices?

We believe that a rural-ready physician is best prepared to practice anywhere. Skills gained in our program can translate to a practice in a town of any size with all doors open to our family physicians. In order to prepare residents for full spectrum practice, we strive to expose you to rural training experiences in block rotation, on outreach, via tele-health, and through preceptors and mentorships.

Where do your graduates practice?

Where do your graduates practice?

More than 60% of our graduates chose to practice in Minnesota, with an additional 16% in Wisconsin. Approximately 63% of our graduates practice in communities of 25,000 people or less.

What is the business economy and workforce like in Duluth?

What is the business economy and workforce like in Duluth?

According to the Northland Connection:

The Northland (2010 Census 370,384) has a wealth of highly educated, competent, and motivated people who are eager to put their skills to work. Area companies and organizations boast of the quality workforce, strong work ethic, low turnover, positive labor/management relations and competitive labor costs.

The region's labor pool is fed by outstanding public schools and higher educational facilities that include three universities, a private college, eight community colleges that are part of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities, Wisconsin Technical College Systems, and a number of specialized vocational schools.

A recent workforce survey reveals that many people live in the Northland to enjoy its high quality of life and have skills beyond their current employment that they would like to utilize.